WILDLIFE RESEARCH

We have conducted numerous studies on some of the world’s most endangered animals. Utilizing our current capacity and know how, we have introduced conservation genetics in research studies of such animals as snow leopard, musk deer, wolf and Asian elephants. Through our Nepal Tiger Genome Project, we are building a comprehensive DNA database of all the Bengal tigers found throughout Terai arc region of Nepal. We have also been working on developing molecular diagnostic tools for the detection of Tuberculosis and Herpes in Asian Elephants. Additionally, we are working on population census studies of the Asiatic one-horned rhino in Chitwan and common leopards in the Annapurna area and conducting ex-situ conservation of threatened species such as Vultures and Amphibians

Wolf

Environmental DNA Meta-Barcoding of fish in Nepal

Knowledge on species distribution and ecology is critical for ecological management and conservation biology. Information on distribution of native fish in Nepalese rivers is limited; there is a paucity of knowledge on accurate morphological, genetic and ecological characterizations of many fish in Nepal.

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Musk_Dear

Wildlife Genetics and Conservation: The Broader Spectrum

Wildlife genetics constitute one of the core research activities at CMDN. As pioneers of non-invasive genetics in Nepal, we have so far studied felids (Tiger, Snow Leopard, Common Leopard, Pallas Cat), Canids (Himalayan Wolf, Dhole), Rodents (Rattus rattus, Himalayan Field Mouse), Rhinos, Elephants and Musk Deer.

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Musk_Dear

Genetic Study of Bengal tigers:

Nepal Tiger Genome Project

Consider yourself fortunate if you spot a tiger deep in jungle- an incredible thrill only few lucky ones get to experience. Sadly, there aren’t many of these beautiful beasts left in the wild!!!

Poaching and probably wildlife diseases have put their...

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Musk_Dear

Genetic species characterization of rodents of Nepal

Many members of the Rattus species have sub-species with various color patterns and they globally distributed. Many Rattus sub-species are believed to be native to India and other Indo-Malayan countries; Rattus rattus thrives in tropical regions but are thought...

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Musk_Dear

Genetics of Trans-Himalayan Wolf (Canis lupus)

Himalayan Wolf is a sub-species of the Gray Wolf- a fairly new species. They are mostly found in India (Jammu, Kashmir) and Nepal with some reported presence in China and Mongolia. There is limited information on basic ecology of this species in the Himalayan...

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Musk_Dear

Molecular based Wildlife Forensics: Genetics and Bioinformatics

The baseline genetic database generated through the Nepal Tiger Genome Project (NTGP) has built an effective tool in the fight against wildlife crime in Nepal and beyond. Seized wildlife parts have been processed ...

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Snow Leopard

Non-invasive genetic population survey of snow leopards (Panthera uncia) in Kangchenjunga and Shey Phoksundo National Park

CMDN, together with WWF-Nepal, the Department of National Parks and Wildlife Conservation and Snow Leopard Conservancy, conducted a non-invasive population survey of snow leopard in Kanchenjunga and Shey Phoksundo area...

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Musk Deer

Musk Deer in Mustang, Nepal

There are three different musk deer species said to exist in Nepal, Moschus chrysogaster, Moschus leucogaster, and Moschus fuscus, although their exact distribution is unclear and yet to be validated by field-based evidence. The primary objective of the research was to confirm the species of musk deer....

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Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV)

Prevalence of Elephant Endotheliotropic Herpes Virus (EEHV) in captive breeding Asian elephants (Elephas maximus) in Nepal

Elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV) is a growing threat to the Asian elephant population worldwide. The disease is characterized by sudden onset of lethargy...

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M. tuberculosis and M. bovis in Asian Elephant

Assessment of detection technique for M. tuberculosis and M. bovis in Asian Elephant of Nepal

Elephant are prone to a variety of infectious disease including tuberculosis, which pose a significant risk to the future conservation of captive and wild Asian elephant populations. Tuberculosis is well documented in Nepal, and previous research has laid foundations for..

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